Thursday, August 16, 2018

9 Sounds Never Heard Before (video)

#Mind Warehouse, July 10, 2018; Crystal Quintero (ed.), Wisdom Quarterly


9 SOUNDS YOU'VE NEVER HEARD BEFORE
BRAIN TIME ► goo.gl/tTWgH2 Human hearing is a rather strange thing. Most recently, on the Internet, a serious dispute arose over the record with an incomprehensible word: some users heard the name "Yanny," while others heard the word "Laurel." But today we are not talking about audio illusions. Do you know how space sounds? And how do ants talk? Or whales sing? The Taos Hum? In today's video, we have collected for you sounds that you most likely have never heard in your life. So be prepared and do not forget to put on your headphones.

Wednesday, August 15, 2018

"HEAL" (documentary)

Heal Documentary; Nita Valens, Inner Vision (KPFK.org); Eliza Darcey, Wisdom Quarterly
 
(HealDocumentary.com) This documentary film takes us on a scientific and spiritual journey where we discover that by changing our perceptions, the human body can heal itself.

There is more to healing than speaking.
The latest science reveals that we are not victims of unchangeable genes, nor should we buy into scary prognoses. The fact is we have more control over our health and life than we have been taught to believe.

This film empowers us with a new understanding of the miraculous nature of the human body and the extraordinary healer in us all.

HEAL not only taps into the brilliant minds of leading scientists and spiritual teachers, it also follows three people on high stakes healing journeys.

Healing can be extremely complex and deeply personal, but it can also happen spontaneously in a instant. Through these inspiring and emotional stories, we find out what works, what doesn't, and why. 

FEATURING: Dr. Deepak Chopra, Anita Moorjani, Marianne Williamson, Dr. Michael Beckwith, Dr. Bruce Lipton, Dr. Joe Dispenza, Anthony William ' Medical Medium', Dr. Bernie Siegel, Gregg Braden, Dr. Joan Borysenko, Dr. David Hamilton, Dr. Kelly Brogan, Rob Wergin, Dr. Kelly Turner, Peter Chrone, Dr Darren Weissman, and Dr Jeffrey Thompson.

Latina beauty is Native American beauty

Blow Your Mind; Bona Publica Films 2017; Xochitl, Crystal Quintero (eds.), Wisdom Quarterly


Native American girls' unique beauty, circa 1800-1900s
✪ Blow Your Mind (twitter.com/NothingMystery and facebook.com/NothingMystery) brings this collection of Native American beauties who bear a striking resemblance to the most beautiful Latin American beauties of today.

Remnants: Native American (Tongva) L.A.


Tongva Springs: Gabrielino/Tongva Tribe Lives Another Generation
(Bona Publica Films, Nov. 13, 2017) After the Native American genocide, the Tongva (Native Los Angelenos) are alive and kicking in Los Angeles. This is a sampling of the festivities of the October 8th, 2017 annual "Life Before Columbus Day" held at Tongva Springs -- in ancient and sacred Kuruvungna (now Santa Monica, California).

Gabrielino-Tongva Chief Anthony "Red Blood" Morales, his son Andy Morales, and their dancers bring forth traditional Tongva dances and songs preserved over hundreds of years from their ancestors. The best news of the day was the announcement that the City of Los Angeles has now officially recognized Indigenous People's Day displacing recognition and celebration of Columbus Day, which for generations has been a grievous injury to Native American communities.

Los Angeles now officially recognizes the new holiday of Indigenous People's Day. The tribe appreciates the honoring of indigenous people in this way and is thankful to the City of LA for being the first in the nation to make such a gesture regarding a nationally recognized holiday.

This historic decision was approved by the mayor's office and the LA City Council. Some of the Tongva dances presented were: Welcome Dance, Acorn Dance, Canoe Dance, Dolphin Dance, Children's Dance. Some of the activities included chia cafe shell necklace making, reed basket making, traditional native games, and other performances by SoCal bird singers Ketzaliztli and the Azteca Dancers. Produced by Bona Publica. Copyright 2017.

Disappointment: addicted to SEX (cartoon)

Access To Insight based on misleading Ven. Thanissaro translations; Seth MacFarlane, Family Guy; Amber Larson, Dhr. Seven, Crystal Quintero, Seth Auberon (eds.), Wisdom Quarterly
WARNING: Graphic references to sex and violence in Family Guy's take on American culture!

If sex is the "best thing," and let's just for the sake of argument say it is, then what does that say about sensuality and samsara that it (sex) is disappointing? It is disappointing, just like all of the things we try to use to find fulfillment, satisfaction, satiation, and solace in this world without end called samsara.

But there is an end, a cessation of suffering, an end to suffering, an incomprehensible nirvana. Why would we ever seek it out unless we first realized that nothing here ever does satisfy us and leave us fulfilled?


Cristina sings that famous sexy old song, "Is That All There Is?"
 
"Disappointment" is one definition of the unsatisfactory (unfulfilling) nature of sex and all sensual pursuits. But no single English word adequately captures the full range and subtlety of the crucial Buddhist term dukkha.

Many translations are proposed ("ill," "unsatisfactoriness," "woe," "suffering," etc.) Each explains part of it while failing to suggest other crucial parts.

There is value in not letting ourselves get too comfortable with any single translation, because the entire thrust of Buddhist practice is the broadening and deepening our understanding of dukkha until its roots are exposed and eliminated once and for all.

One helpful rule of thumb is that as soon as we think we've found the single best translation for the word, let's think again. No matter how we describe it, dukkha is always broader, subtler, and more unsatisfactory than that.
 
The Buddha's definition
"Birth is dukkha, aging is dukkha, death is dukkha; sorrow, lamentation, pain, grief, and despair are dukkha; meeting with the unloved is dukkha; being separated from the loved is dukkha; not getting what is wanted is dukkha. In brief, the Five Aggregates clung to as a self are dukkha." — SN 56.11
 
Sariputra's elaboration
[Ven. Sariputra:] "What now, friends, is the noble truth of suffering (disappointment)? Birth is suffering, aging is suffering, death is suffering; sorrow, lamentation, pain, distress, and despair are suffering; meeting with the unloved is suffering; being separated from the loved is suffering; not getting what is wanted is suffering. In short, the Five Aggregates clung to as a self are suffering.

"And what is birth? Whatever rebirth, taking rebirth, descent, again coming-to-be, coming-forth, appearance of aggregates, and acquisition of [sense] bases of various [kinds of] beings in this or that world of beings [in any of the countless worlds in the 31 Planes of Existence], that is called birth.

"And what is aging? Whatever aging, decrepitude, brokenness, graying, wrinkling, decline of life-force, weakening of the faculties of the various beings in this or that world of beings, that is called aging.

"And what is death? Whatever dying, deceasing, passing away, breaking up, disappearance, death, completion of time, break up of the aggregates, casting off of the body, interruption in the life faculty of the various beings in this or that world of beings, that is called death.

"And what is sorrow? Whatever sorrow, sorrowing, sadness, inward sorrow, inward sadness of anyone suffering from misfortune, touched by a painful thing, that is called sorrow.

"And what is lamentation? Whatever crying, grieving, lamenting, weeping, wailing, misery of anyone suffering from misfortune, touched by a painful thing, that is called lamentation."

And what is pain? Whatever is experienced as bodily pain, bodily discomfort, pain or discomfort born of bodily contact, that is called pain.

"And what is distress? Whatever is experienced as mental pain, mental discomfort, pain or discomfort born of mental contact, that is called distress.

"And what is despair? Whatever despair, despondency, desperation of anyone suffering from misfortune, touched by a painful thing, that is called despair."

And what is the suffering of being connected to the unloved? There is the case where undesirable, unpleasing, unattractive sights, sounds, aromas, flavors, or tactile sensations occur to one; or one has connection, contact, relationship, interaction with those who wish one ill, who wish for one's harm, who wish for one's discomfort, who wish one no security from the yoke. This is called the suffering of being connected to the unloved.

"And what is the suffering of being separated from the loved? There is the case where desirable, pleasing, attractive sights, sounds, aromas, flavors, or tactile sensations do not occur to one; or one has no connection, no contact, no relationship, no interaction with those who wish one well, who wish for one's benefit, who wish for one's comfort, who wish one security from the yoke, nor with one's mother, father, brother, sister, friends, companions, or relatives. This is called the suffering of being separated from the loved.

"And what is the stress of not getting what is wanted? In beings subject to rebirth, the wish arises, 'O, may we not be subject to rebirth, and may rebirth not come to us.' But this [freedom from rebirth] is not to be achieved by wanting. This is the suffering of not getting what is wanted.

"In beings subject to aging... illness... death... sorrow, lamentation, pain, distress, and despair, the wish arises, 'O, may we not be subject to aging... illness... death... sorrow, lamentation, pain, distress, and despair, and may aging... illness... death... sorrow, lamentation, pain, distress, and despair not come to us.' But this is not to be achieved by wanting. This is the stress of not getting what is wanted. — MN 141
 
A contemporary definition
We're not bunnies. We're human
Dukkha is: disturbance, irritation, dejection, worry, despair, fear, dread, anguish, anxiety; vulnerability, injury, inability, inferiority; sickness, aging, decay of body and faculties, senility; pain/pleasure; excitement/boredom; deprivation/excess; desire/frustration, suppression; longing/aimlessness; hope/hopelessness; effort, activity, striving/repression; loss, want, insufficiency/satiety; love/lovelessness, friendlessness; dislike, aversion/attraction; parenthood/childlessness; submission/rebellion; decision/indecisiveness, vacillation, uncertainty.
— Francis Story in Suffering, in Vol. II of The Three Basic Facts of Existence (Kandy: Buddhist Publication Society, BPS.lk)

Problem-Solution
The Buddha said, "Formerly as now, it is only dukkha I describe and the cessation of dukkha." — SN 22.86
 
Three kinds of dukkha
Date my three daughters, Siddhartha!
"There are these three forms of suffering, my friend: the suffering of pain, the suffering of fabrication (formations), and the suffering of change. These are the three forms of suffering."...

[Jambukhadika the Wanderer:] "What is the path, what is the practice for the full comprehension of these forms of suffering?"
 
"Precisely this ennobling Eightfold Path, my friend: right view, right intention, right speech, right action, right livelihood, right effort, right mindfulness, and right concentration. This is the path, this is the practice for the full comprehension of these forms of suffering." — SN 38.14

Tuesday, August 14, 2018

Might I have ASMR? (video)

Kelly Ani, CC Liu, Wisdom Quarterly; This American Life; Rapunzel ASMR (11/2/17); Chole
Miss Chloe ASMR wiki, Miss Chloe ASMR history, Miss Chloe ASMR news




Twin Ear Cleaning That Will Make You Tingle 150%. [Enjoy 22 minutes of this as recorded with my special ASMR mic sr3d.co.uk pro version].

Crazy Tingling
ASMR stands for "autonomous sensory meridian response." It is an experience characterized by a static cling or tingling sensation on the skin.

It typically begins on the scalp and moves down the back of the neck and upper spine. It has been compared with auditory-tactile synesthesia.
 
ASMR signifies the subjective experience of "low-grade euphoria" characterized by "a combination of positive feelings and a distinct static-like tingling sensation on the skin."

It is most commonly triggered by specific auditory or visual stimuli, and less commonly by intentional attention control. More
ASMR explained on This American Life

How could whispering change one's life? Andrea Seigel tells this story about finding out that she is undeniably not alone. She’s a novelist with several books including Like the Red Panda.


Twin Ear Cleaning That Will Make You Tingle 150% [22 mins] - ASMR

News of the Day: Life in the 1950s (cartoon)

Democracy Now; Family Guy; C. Quintero, Seth Auberon, Pat Macpherson, Wisdom Quarterly





    Monday, August 13, 2018

    Love's suffering: "We're just FRIENDS!" (video)

    Marshmello & Anne-Marie; BD; Ashley Wells, Crystal Quintero (eds.), Wisdom Quarterly

     
    Heartbreak hurts so much, so very much. This disappointment/pain is called dukkha in Buddhism, a word that covers the range of unpleasant sensation:
    • grief, lamentation, despair, distress, woe, ill, misery, off-kilter, unsatisfactoriness, or the catchall "suffering."
    Dukkha (the opposite of the Buddhist word sukha that covers the range of pleasant sensations or "happiness") refers to painful feeling, which may be bodily or mental. (The Buddhist word for "feeling" is vedanā).
     
    Disappointment/suffering is the first of the Four Noble Truth , the thing that causes most of us to strive for freedom, liberation, and the final "end of all suffering" (nirvana) that comes with enlightenment. It is the second of the Three Universal Characteristics of Existence.



    The term is not limited to painful experience as under, but refers to the unsatisfactory (dissatisfying, unsatisfactory) nature and the general insecurity of all conditioned phenomena. Such phenomena are things dependent for their existence on constituents or conditions.

    On account of their impermanence, all are liable to result in disappointment/suffering. The shocking thing is that this includes pleasurable experiences.

    So "unsatisfactoriness" -- which refers to all the things "liable to result in suffering" -- is a more adequate rendering than "suffering." Let's go with "disappointment."

    The first noble truth does not deny the existence of happiness, joy, or pleasurable experiences, as is often wrongly assumed. This is illustrated by the following sutra excerpts when the Buddha said:

    Sutra
    "Seeking SATISFACTION in the world, meditators, I had pursued my way. That satisfaction in the world I found. Insofar as satisfaction exists in the world, I have well perceived it by wisdom.

    "Seeking for MISERY in the world, meditators, I had pursued my way. That misery in the world I found. Insofar as misery exists in the world, I have well perceived it by wisdom.

    "Seeking for the ESCAPE from the world, meditators, I had pursued my way. That escape from the world I found. Insofar as an escape from the world exists, I have well perceived it by wisdom" (A.iii.105).
     
    "If there were no satisfaction [pleasure, joy, happiness] to be found in the world, beings would not be attached to the world....

    "If there were no misery to be found in the world, beings would not be repelled by the world....

    "If there were no escape from the world, beings could not escape from the world" (A.iii.106).
    • For Buddhist texts on the noble truth of suffering, see The Word of the Buddha and The Path to Deliverance by Ven. Nyanatiloka (BPS.lk)
    • See The Three Basic Facts of Existence, II: Suffering (BPS.lk, Wheel #191/193)